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Talk show suspended, Larry King resigned to career in movies

A Youth Media blog may seem an odd place to comment on the swansong of a media legend, but Larry King casts such a long shadow that it stretches far beyond his original US based CNN audience.

Even at 76, Mr King’s trademark coif and braces are instantly recognisable to any teenager with even a passing interest in movies or celebrities.  He’s been in more films than many Hollywood actors and most of his movies have been aimed squarely at young audiences.

How this for an acting CV?

Shrek Forever After (2010)

All Kids Count (2010)

E Tenebris Lux (From the darkness, light)

In March I blogged about a film called Shank; a controversial movie addressing issues of gang violence and how to react to it.

The characters have to decide how to respond when one of them is killed, and despite their initial instinct for revenge, they eventually decide to walk away.

Together we can stop knife crime

Count Us In

The film was well received by critics (see The Independent’s review here) and received a seal of approval from the Damilola Taylor Trust.

TenNine had been asked to carry posters for the cinema release of the film, which we did as we felt it complemented the other campaigns against knives and violence we had carried this academic year.

Bebo sale highlights weakness of online advertising models

Bargain basement bebo

Bebo is passing into the hands of Criterion Capital Partners Fund, an investment vehicle with no web / social networking expertise or industry partners.

Wouldn’t they be better off tying up with an existing organisation that could add expertise and help them push the Bebo environment?

Criterion’s own website is dead.  The current page is just a 404.  Hardly the most promising partner to help Bebo develop the wider web presence it needs!

Echoes beached far away in time

What’s the first song you ever heard?

The one that pops into your head every now and again and you just can’t get rid of.  The one you probably never liked anyway and even if you did, it’s been echoing around the back of your mind for so long now that it’s not really just music any more.  It’s a fragment of your own personal theme tune, a beached fish twitching on the sand at the edge of your memory.

Much as I’d like to pretend mine was by someone cool like Martha and the Muffins, it was actually January by Pilot:

Who ate all the the humble pies?

Another day eating humble pie over at Facebook central!

According to early reports hitting the UK news wires, after eight months of saying the CEOP panic button is unnecessary, Facebook have made a complete climbdown and the button will now appear on user profile pages.

It’s not clear so far what timelines they will work to, but Talking to Youth is happy that adding its voice to those of every Police Force in Great Britain, the UK Government, CEOP and many hundreds of thousands of concerned parents has helped in some way to get Facebook to examine their priorities and make the necessary changes.

“Extremely humbling”

Finally some positive news from our friends over the pond at Facebook following what their top brass have referred to as an ‘extremely humbling’ few weeks.

New improved and, more importantly, simpler privacy options are to be rolled out, so users will no longer have to wrestle with the 50 different privacy settings and 170 options currently baffling anyone trying to protect their data.

But crucially it’s still not clear if this means the sale of personal data without reference to the user has stopped outright, or if it just gives the originator of the data the option to not have it sold on by selecting the right privacy settings.  If it is still an opt-out option hidden behind a flummery of complex settings, Facebook may still have some way to go.

Facebook to bolt stable door… maybe

It’s good to see that Facebook staff are apparently sitting down today to finally get to grips with privacy issues.  Everyone’s privacy should be taken seriously, but when millions of teenagers and children are involved, security becomes absolutely essential.

I blogged here about the Facebook’s baffling refusal to include the CEOPS panic button, despite the request from all UK police forces.  That attitude, the software flaw that allowed access to contact details (since fixed) and now the giving to third party websites of permission to post users’ views without their specific consent, all betray a complete failure of the security responsibilities of Facebook to keep up with its data-sharing culture.

Too cool for school?

At the ripe old age of 11, I decided that the fastest way to manly cool was the futuristic brushed metal and black packaging of the newly launched Lambert & Butler cigarettes.

Don’t mock; it was 1978.  In a time when Roger Moore somehow got away with playing James Bond, electro-pop meant the Electric Light Orchestra and fashionable men had centre partings, it wasn’t just my idea of cool pre-teen rebellion that was a bit misplaced.  And I really needed to rebel, because my mum wouldn’t let me see Grease.
Cool may have moved on – or even gone full circle – but the reasons teenagers take up smoking are still pretty much the same.  It’s cool, and it’s for adults only.

Facebook pressing all the wrong buttons

Facebook needs a Click CEOP buttonAt TenNine we always put youth safety above any other concern, and I’m certain all of our peers in UK Youth Marketing do the same.  So the current ‘Facebook concedes online safety demands’ story didn’t just catch my eye, I can only say I am utterly astonished at Facebook’s position.

Advertising Association prepares “Children’s Ethical Communications Kit”

What a truly sensible initiative from the Advertising Association (AA) in looking to launch an online service to help companies develop responsible products and campaigns which target children. Debate regarding advertising and marketing to children is so often geared to a strain of Pavlov’s dogs, knee jerk reaction which says simply that it is all wrong.  What is said and written is usually well intentioned but also way too simplistic; you have to keep an eye on the baby when you empty that bathwater!