Talking To Youth Rotating Header Image

Adam Deacon

E Tenebris Lux (From the darkness, light)

In March I blogged about a film called Shank; a controversial movie addressing issues of gang violence and how to react to it.

The characters have to decide how to respond when one of them is killed, and despite their initial instinct for revenge, they eventually decide to walk away.

Together we can stop knife crime

Count Us In

The film was well received by critics (see The Independent’s review here) and received a seal of approval from the Damilola Taylor Trust.

TenNine had been asked to carry posters for the cinema release of the film, which we did as we felt it complemented the other campaigns against knives and violence we had carried this academic year.

Shank: making a point

The shocking events at London’s Victoria station last Thursday, when a teenager was murdered by a large group of youths appearing to be a school gang, shows that the level of knife crime among young people is clearly as rife as ever.

The government and charities have been very forward thinking and established several anti-knife and anti-violence initiatives, with sites like  www.itdoesnthavetohappen.co.uk and www.cybermentors.org offering young people places to seek help and advice.  Both were promoted through the Ten Nine networks of secondary schools and youth centres to place the messages directly into young people’s minds, using posters and clings.  The launch of the government campaign focusing on abuse in teenage relationships was also communicated direct to its 13-18 year old target audience with posters and postcards in youth centres and schools.