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Advertising in Schools

What’s the point of social media?

I love this article from Mark Ritson in Marketing Week, questioning the wisdom of advertisers promoting their messages through social media.

Since some of the largest users of traditional advertising are trying to move most or all of their presence online, it’s very timely to question the effectiveness of the strategy.

As Ritson points out, “social media” literally means the communication channels that exist between people.  Not between brands.  He cites the recent TNS Digital Life report which found that 61% of UK consumers do not want to interact with brands on social media, and he sums up with a damning quote from the report: “Misguided digital strategies are generating mountains of digital waste, from friendless Facebook accounts to blogs no one reads”.

Unmissable

How to get the most important messages through to young people, where they absolutely can’t miss them?  Simple, really – have a look at this!

Are you talking to me?

What do young people actually think about the advertising aimed at them?  Check out this video to see how school pupils and their educators appreciate effective messaging!

Too cool for school?

At the ripe old age of 11, I decided that the fastest way to manly cool was the futuristic brushed metal and black packaging of the newly launched Lambert & Butler cigarettes.

Don’t mock; it was 1978.  In a time when Roger Moore somehow got away with playing James Bond, electro-pop meant the Electric Light Orchestra and fashionable men had centre partings, it wasn’t just my idea of cool pre-teen rebellion that was a bit misplaced.  And I really needed to rebel, because my mum wouldn’t let me see Grease.
Cool may have moved on – or even gone full circle – but the reasons teenagers take up smoking are still pretty much the same.  It’s cool, and it’s for adults only.

Targeting media to support PSHE

We are very pleased to see that the annual statistics just published by ONS that show teenage pregnancy is at its lowest rate for more than 20 years.

TenNine has supported the work of PSHE Coordinators and Youth Workers with teenage pregnancy posters and the distribution of complementary material many times in recent years.  We have facilitated national campaigns in schools and colleges by central government and delivered local government advertising.  Closely targeted media supporting the key mentoring work that teachers and youth workers provide delivers the right messages to young people where they spend most of their time.

Kellogg’s misdirected marketing

Strange to see Kellogg’s whipping up the wrath of UK parents by running their recent “Coco Pops” campaign with a copyline like “Ever thought of Coco Pops after school?”

What on Earth were they thinking? It was almost inevitable that there would be complaints.

Sure enough, following the lambasting they received, their 6 sheet campaign was taken down – but not in time to avoid the PR disaster of undermining their position as a National Partner for Change for Life

It’s a real shame, as they do a lot of good in the community that is perhaps less well known.

NHS Life Check – A Repeat Prescription!

We are delighted that the NHS was so pleased by the results of its Life Check campaign in June that it decided to re-book in September.

The poster campaign included all schools and youth clubs in specific English Primary Care Trust areas.

The Life Check website addresses anxieties & life questions facing young people.

It looks at issues of identity as well as attitudes to physical activity, healthy living, drugs and alcohol, smoking, sex and bullying.

The second booking is a real vote of confidence in our member clubs and schools and a great start to the new academic year.