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Teen marketing

What’s the point of social media?

I love this article from Mark Ritson in Marketing Week, questioning the wisdom of advertisers promoting their messages through social media.

Since some of the largest users of traditional advertising are trying to move most or all of their presence online, it’s very timely to question the effectiveness of the strategy.

As Ritson points out, “social media” literally means the communication channels that exist between people.  Not between brands.  He cites the recent TNS Digital Life report which found that 61% of UK consumers do not want to interact with brands on social media, and he sums up with a damning quote from the report: “Misguided digital strategies are generating mountains of digital waste, from friendless Facebook accounts to blogs no one reads”.

Too cool for school?

At the ripe old age of 11, I decided that the fastest way to manly cool was the futuristic brushed metal and black packaging of the newly launched Lambert & Butler cigarettes.

Don’t mock; it was 1978.  In a time when Roger Moore somehow got away with playing James Bond, electro-pop meant the Electric Light Orchestra and fashionable men had centre partings, it wasn’t just my idea of cool pre-teen rebellion that was a bit misplaced.  And I really needed to rebel, because my mum wouldn’t let me see Grease.
Cool may have moved on – or even gone full circle – but the reasons teenagers take up smoking are still pretty much the same.  It’s cool, and it’s for adults only.

CAP launches new UK Advertising Codes

On the 16th March the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) launched new UK Advertising Codes after a comprehensive review and full public consultation.

This was the first ever concurrent review of all advertising codes in nearly fifty years of their history and more than 400 pieces of legislation and 30,000 consultation responses were assessed. Participants were derived from a broad range of stakeholders including Government, parents and children’s groups, consumer protection bodies, regulators, charities, religious organisations as well as the media industry.  The new codes will come into force on 1st September 2010 giving advertisers and the media industry nearly six months to familiarise themselves with the new rules.